CELEBRATING LOCAL ARTISTS AND MAKERS - fridays 12-5pm, saturdays 10am - 5pm, sundays 11am- 4pm

Poliana Danila - Fiber Artist and Broom Maker

Poliana is a landscape designer turned fiber artist and broom maker. Originally from Romania, Poliana watched her parents and grandparents working in the garden and combining whatever natural world provided with craft, art and function. With a graduate degree in Landscape Design/Horticulture and she has incorporated her knowledge of plant life into her beautiful pieces.

 

Artist's statement: "Since I was a child, I have found that working with my hands, with natural elements, fibers, plants, stones, as well as gardening, cooking, knotting, weaving brings me the deepest peace and healing. Brooms are essential to one's home. I remember vividly my grandmothers using the broom made of twigs and my mom using large goose or duck wings to sweep the fireplace hearths. When I sit down to make or create something, I become more embodied, and the stresses of trying to just simply be in this modern industrialized world begin to fade away. In these moments I can feel the way my ancestors would sit, pray, sing and laugh together while doing this work. I can see the magic and beauty that can be woven into our everyday tools and materials and how that deeply gives life to our spirits. My two girls forage for my broom sticks in our forest or on the Catskill aqueduct, which they follow by a session of carving. A handcrafted broom can open/close ritual circles and keeps an old art alive. My brooms make an extraordinarily effective Sweeper, Medicine Lymph Brush, Altar piece and a beautiful Art piece for the wall. The horsehair that I use for brooms comes from several Native American gatherers. They collect expired animals who have either become victims to roadkill, starvation in the winter months, die of old age or hunted for food. The Native Americans hold all animals high and believe all the parts of the animal are useful for many purposes.  Broomcorn (Sorghum vulgare) originally comes from Africa but can be grown here in the States and in South America. Ixtle, also known by the trade name Tampico fiber, is a stiff plant fiber obtained from a number of Mexican plants, chiefly species of Agave and Yucca."